hillary clinton

Eileen Elibol / WNED | WBFO

The state’s Democratic Party leaders have voted to greatly shorten the lead time before voters can register to cast a ballot in the 2020 Presidential primaries.

President Trump began his rally in Wisconsin Wednesday night by condemning apparent explosive devices sent to former President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and others, saying that "any acts or threats of political violence are an attack on democracy itself."

"No nation can succeed that tolerates violence or the threat of violence as a method of political intimidation," Trump said, pledging an "aggressive investigation" that will bring the suspects to justice "hopefully very soon."

Twitter

The unending saga of the Russians and the 2016 election is continuing to spin. A local man involved in Republican politics is now telling a House committee and special counsel he met with a Russian offering to sell dirt on Hillary Clinton, but he had forgotten about it until recently.

Cuomo Campaign

Gov. Andrew Cuomo called in Democratic Party stalwarts Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden to endorse him as the incumbent received the overwhelming support of delegates Thursday at the state Democratic Convention on Long Island.

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Cynthia Nixon spent Thursday traveling the New York State Thruway from Syracuse to Rochester as part of her upstate campaign swing. In between stops, the actor and underdog candidate talked about how Hillary Clinton’s loss in the 2016 presidential race helped inspire her to run for governor and why she thinks Andrew Cuomo is not doing enough to help the state.


U.S. Congress

The speaker list for Congresswoman Louise Slaughter’s funeral has been announced, and contains some well-known politicians who will travel to Rochester to reflect on Slaughter’s legacy.

There's a small chance that if Saturday Night Live hadn't been so mean to former New York Gov. David Paterson, Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand wouldn't be in the U.S. Senate.

In late 2008, Hillary Clinton was vacating her Senate seat for the State Department, and the New York governor was trying to decide who should fill it.

"It was the stereotypical Mr. Magoo, blind character who does everything wrong and in a sense is actually stupid in addition to being blind," Paterson, who is legally blind, recalls of the SNL skit.

Hillary Clinton visits Buffalo, signs copies of new book

Sep 28, 2017
Michael Mroziak, WBFO

An estimated 1,000 people lined up as early as 8:30 a.m. Thursday to have a brief opportunity to meet the former presidential candidate, Secretary of State and First Lady. Hillary Clinton arrived in Buffalo during the noon hour to sign copies of her book, What Happened, for supporters, many of whom are still stunned by last November's loss.


Hillary Clinton Is 'Done,' But Not Going Away

Sep 12, 2017

Hillary Clinton's final campaign for office ended in a shocking defeat. But she isn't going quietly into the night.

"I think the country's at risk, and I'm trying to sound the alarm so more people will at least pay attention," Clinton told NPR.

That said, her career as a candidate is over.

"I'm done. I'm not running for office," Clinton said. But for those, including Democrats, who would like her to just go away? "Well, they're going to be disappointed," she said.

WBFO News file photo

The Larkin Square Author Series and talking Leaves Books announced Monday that Hillary Rodham Clinton will be appearing September 28th in Buffalo for a book signing.  However, as WBFO's senior reporter Eileen Buckley tells us there will be some limits and restrictions for fans who want to meet the former presidential candidate up-close.


Hillary Clinton to visit Buffalo in September

Aug 28, 2017
WBFO News photo by Eileen Koteras Elibol WNED/WBFO News

Former presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton will be traveling to Buffalo late next month.  Clinton will be conducting a book signing at Larkin Square on Thursday, September 28th at 12:30 p.m.  It will be presented the Larkin Square Author Series and Talking Leaves Books.

Updated at 12:36 p.m. ET, July 11

Donald Trump Jr. was informed ahead of a June 2016 meeting with a Kremlin-linked lawyer that material damaging to Hillary Clinton that he was offered was "part of a Russian government effort to aid his father's candidacy," the New York Times reported Monday evening.

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Hillary Clinton has launched a new political organization. The former Democratic presidential nominee unveiled "Onward Together'' on Monday afternoon.

Karen DeWitt

Former President Bill Clinton cast his ballot for his wife, failed Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton, at Monday’s Electoral College meeting in Albany. Clinton blames the loss on the Russians and the FBI.

Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce CEO Bob Duffy

Electors are gathering Monday in every state to formally elect the President and Vice President of the United States. Usually this is a mere formality, but anti-Donald Trump forces are trying one last time to deny him the White House.

5 Things You Should Know About The Electoral College

Dec 19, 2016

Electors from the 50 states will convene in their state capitols Monday and cast their votes for president. Republican Donald Trump is assured of a victory, unless there is a massive — and totally unexpected — defection by the electors who are pledged to support him.

Here are five things you should know about the Electoral College:

1. How do you get to be an elector?

In a wide-ranging exit interview, NPR's Steve Inskeep asks President Obama about Russian interference in the U.S. election, executive power, the future of the Democratic party and his future role.

Steve Inskeep: Thanks for joining us one more time; I really appreciate it.

President Obama: Great to be with you, Steve.

Labor Secretary Tom Perez Running For DNC Chair

Dec 16, 2016

The contest to see who will be the next leader of the Democratic National Committee has just gotten much more interesting — it's also looking a bit like a proxy battle between President Obama and Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Associated Press

There was joy in the air Tuesday, as State Republican Chair Ed Cox and Erie County Republican Chair Nick Langworthy reflected on what they called a great election year for the GOP and an opportunity to change politics - in New York and nationally under President-Elect Donald Trump.

President-elect Donald Trump doesn't seem to like suggestions that his victory over Hillary Clinton was anything but huge.

Trump made false claims that Clinton's lead in the popular vote was due to illegal voting.

He has chafed at recount efforts in states like Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania — even though such recounts pose no risk to Trump's victory, since he won those states by tens of thousands of votes.

Hillary Clinton's campaign said Saturday it will participate in the recount efforts in Wisconsin spearheaded by Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein. If Stein also pursues recounts in Pennsylvania and Michigan, as she has pledged, the Clinton campaign will participate in those efforts, as well.

The recount in Wisconsin could begin as early as next week.

Two weeks after Election Day, Hillary Clinton leads President-elect Donald Trump by 1.75 million votes. Despite Clinton's popular vote lead, Trump will move into the White House because he won the Electoral College.

Clinton's margin will grow in the coming weeks — mostly because of California, where there are still more than 2 million unprocessed ballots.

Wednesday night, Hillary Clinton spoke publicly for the first time since her concession speech a week ago. At a Children's Defense Fund event in Washington, she spoke about the importance of fighting for America's kids, but she also wove in another message, telling her supporters to persist, even after the devastating loss of the presidential race.

"I know many of you are deeply disappointed about the results of the election," she said. "I am, too, more than I can ever express."

It's no secret that Donald Trump campaigned as a champion of gun rights, but a Trump administration poses both welcome relief and an immediate problem for the gun industry.

For Larry Cavener, who recently visited a new gun shop called Tactical Advantage in Overland Park, Kan., this election means he can breathe easier.

"This means that we're not gonna be under siege for a few years, and it seems like it has been," Cavener says.

A week after the election, the Ombudsman inbox is still fielding a heavy influx of emails with audience opinions about NPR's presidential campaign journalism. Many of the emails have been vitriolic, a reflection of hard-felt voter emotions, no doubt.

At his first news conference following his party's shocking loss at the ballot box last week, President Obama appeared to needle Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's campaign for not paying enough attention to rural voters who eventually handed President-elect Donald Trump the upset victory.

"When your team loses, everybody gets deflated, and it's hard, and it's challenging," Obama said. "I think it's a healthy thing for the Democratic Party to go through some reflection."

Governor Cuomo is adopting a more conciliatory tone toward President elect Donald Trump, after Cuomo called Trump “un-New York” in the final days of the campaign.


While Donald Trump's victory in the Presidential election came as a surprise to many, there was one local Republican figure who believed in Trump's possibilities from the start. According to Buffalo News Political Reporter Bob McCarthy, developer Carl Paladino "saw something that nobody else did, including the pollsters."


Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton finds herself on the wrong end of an electoral split, moving ahead in the popular vote but losing to President-elect Donald Trump in the Electoral College, according to election results that are still being finalized.

As of midday Thursday ET, Clinton had amassed 59,938,290 votes nationally, to Trump's 59,704,886 — a margin of 233,404 that puts Clinton on track to become the fifth U.S. presidential candidate to win the popular vote but lose the election.

Donald Trump will be the next president of the United States.

That's remarkable for all sorts of reasons: He has no governmental experience, for example. And many times during his campaign, Trump's words inflamed large swaths of Americans, whether it was his comments from years ago talking about grabbing women's genitals or calling Mexican immigrants in the U.S. illegally "rapists" and playing up crimes committed by immigrants, including drug crimes and murders.

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