Hurricane Irma

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

President Trump denied the death toll of nearly 3,000 from hurricanes Maria and Irma, which swept across Puerto Rico a year ago, in a series of tweets Thursday morning.

"3000 people did not die in the two hurricanes that hit Puerto Rico," he tweeted. "When I left the island, AFTER the storm had hit, they had anywhere from 6 to 18 deaths."

Trump then blamed Democrats for the figures, "to make me look as bad as possible."

The Federal Emergency Management Agency was ordered to once again extend a housing program for survivors of Hurricanes Maria and Irma, whose homes in Puerto Rico were destroyed and are now living in U.S. and Puerto Rico hotels.

WBFO File Photo / WBFO News

Governor Andrew Cuomo is deploying members of the National Guard and the New York State Police to the US Virgin Islands.

WBFO File Photo / WBFO News

With Hurricane Irma now present in the State of Florida U.S. Senator Charles Schumer is pushing a new law that would prevent communication breakdowns in emergency disasters.

Updated at 5 a.m. ET Monday

Irma has weakened since beginning its push up central Florida, but is still a Category 1 hurricane with winds near 75 mph and higher gusts, according to the National Hurricane Center. Its center is about 60 miles north of Tampa and continues to move along the northwest coast of the Florida peninsula. The NHC says Irma is expected to weaken to a tropical storm this morning and tropical depression by Tuesday afternoon.

Hurricane Irma's punishing winds and life-threatening storm surge have already left an imprint, and there is more catastrophic damage expected to come as Irma takes a projected path up Florida's west coast.