IRS

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

U.S. taxpayers will have a three-month extension to file their taxes because of the coronavirus pandemic, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Friday.

He said that at the president's direction, "we are moving Tax Day from April 15 to July 15."

"All taxpayers and businesses will have this additional time to file and make payments without interest or penalties," Mnuchin added.

At the same time, he encouraged people who are set to receive refunds to file earlier so that they can get their money more quickly.

Governor's Office

The nation's new tax law places a cap on the amount of state and local taxes that someone can deduct from their taxable federal income. That caused panic in high-tax states like New York. So the state's lawmakers amended their tax system to mitigate the increased costs for New Yorkers - changes the federal government may soon attempt to nullify.

File Photo / WBFO News

Buffalo Public Schools have settled with New York State for just under $1.2 million in previously unreported income taxes for district employees.

Members of Congress have said they want to loosen rules for health savings accounts. Did they do it in the latest spending bill? Do people who were uncovered for one month in 2017 owe a tax penalty? And how can immigrants who move to the U.S. to retire get insurance? These are the questions I'm tackling for readers this week:

I heard that health savings account rules would be loosened under the new spending bill passed by Congress last month. Did that happen?

No. In fact, the standards have become slightly tighter this year.

Republicans in Congress are promising that their tax bill will create jobs. One place where we know it's going to create a lot of work is at the IRS.

That agency will have to figure out how to interpret and implement the hundreds of pages of changes to the tax code that were just passed, at a time when it is already struggling with budget cuts and staff reductions.

The Trump administration says it's already working with the IRS to update tax forms and withholding tables, promising that most taxpayers will notice a difference in their pay stubs by February.

FAFSA

For many, the college application process may be a little easier this year because the Internal Revenue Service has again switched on its computer program allowing income tax records to be meshed into college financial aid applications.

Time is ticking down for income tax return filers

Apr 18, 2017
Internal Revenue Service

Tick...tick...tick... Some are surely scrambling Tuesday, as midnight is the deadline for filing state and federal income tax returns.

FAFSA

For hundreds of thousands of prospective college students, the most important paperwork may be the dreaded FAFSA form, the pathway to federal financial aid. Now, a change at the Internal Revenue Service is making that process more complicated.

via National Public Radio

The Internal Revenue Service is extending deadlines to file business income tax returns for small businesses affected by wind and snow storms in the state.

This is a time of year for an annual scam, posing as the Internal Revenue Service and and asking for money over the phone. Attorney Nicole Parshall says the real IRS puts it in writing. She's our guest this week on You & The Law, talking about scams on seniors.


Area residents receive fake IRS calls

Feb 7, 2016

Authorities are warning area residents to beware of fraudulent phone calls from people claiming to be with the IRS.

WBFO File Photo / WBFO News

A criminal investigation has resulted in a guilty plea in a tax fraud case.

Lancaster Police warn: Beware of IRS scam

Nov 7, 2014
WBFO News File Photo

Lancaster Police are warning of an IRS phone scam that uses "spoofing technology" and intimidation to convince victims of their authenticity.


WBFO File Photo / WBFO News

A Buffalo woman has pleaded  guilty to stealing government funds.

On this week's edition of You and The Law, attorney Michael Tedesco talks with WBFO's Mike Desmond about bargaining with the IRS over taxes on overseas assets.

Washington and Ottawa have signed a deal that means Canadian banks won't have to report on their American customers to the I-R-S.  But that doesn't let those American customers living north of the border, off the hook.  The deal means Canada's Revenue agency will collect the information, and then pass it on to its U-S counterparts.  And that's not sitting well with many.  

facebook.com/PeopleForGaughan

It appears the Democratic candidate looking to unseat the current Erie County Comptroller has had some tax trouble.