Janus v AFSCME

NewChoiceNY.com

A newly formed group is reaching out to public worker union members in New York, informing them of their rights — under the recently decided U.S. Supreme Court Janus case — to opt out of their unions. But union leaders say the organization is a front group for anti-union billionaires.


Unions have been sounding the alarm since the June 27 U.S. Supreme Court Janus ruling that public employees can stop paying union dues while retaining many of the benefits from collective bargaining. An anti-union group is sounding its own alarm among New York's public employees.

National Public Radio

Area unions are pushing back against the U.S. Supreme Court's Janus v. AFSCME decision, which allows public employees to gain pay and benefits under union contracts without paying union dues. Union leaders made clear during a news conference Monday they expect a future push to do the same to private sector unions.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

The Erie County Legislature locked itself up Thursday in a round of recesses, legislative clarifications and proposed amendments of proposed amendments. It was over a U.S. Supreme Court decision limiting public employee union rights to collect dues from non-members.

wnyalf.org

For Richard Lipsitz, president of the WNY Area Labor Federation, the Supreme Court decision in Janus v AFSCME came as no surprise. The ruling outlaws mandatoy union dues for government employees. While some predict the move will have a crippling effect, Lipsitz says New York public employee unions have spent the last 20 months preparing for the decision by working to galvanize the support of their members.


BuffaloState.edu

Organized labor across the nation suffered a major blow Wednesday when the U.S. Supreme Court issued its ruling in Janus v. AFSCME. With the decision, public employees are no longer required to pay union dues, though they may still benefit from union-bargained contracts. "This has an impact on New York more than any other state," said Peter Yacobucci, professor of political science at Buffalo State College. "It will be devastating for public sector unions."


New York’s union leaders are condemning the U.S. Supreme Court decision that upheld the right of a worker to not pay union dues. But a newly passed state law might mitigate the effects of Janus v. AFSCME.


WBFO file photo

Supporters of organized labor were dealt a legal blow by the U.S. Supreme Court Monday, which ruled 5-to-4 that companies have the right to prohibit collective grievances by its workers. It raises the question: is this just the first blow organized labor may face by the nation's highest court this spring?


A case that was heard Monday by the U.S. Supreme Court and will be decided later this year could have a big impact on public worker unions in New York.