Johnson & Johnson

The distribution of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine may be on pause, says Dr. Nancy Nielsen, but its benefits are still worth considering "Remember, we've had 7 million people that have already gotten it." The former President of the American Medical Association is applauding the decision to halt distribution, calling the move "government at its best." As health officials review the data, Nielsen offers some thoughts for those who have already received the vaccine.


Kevin P. Coughlin / Office of the Governor

New York State Health Commissioner Howard Zucker said the state will stop administering the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Johnson & Johnson.

Updated April 13, 2021 at 2:11 PM ET

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday they are recommending a "pause" in the use of the single-dose Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine out of an "abundance of caution" while a review of reports of rare, potentially dangerous blood clots is conducted.

Cheryl Gerber / AP

Catholic Health in Buffalo is distributing the J&J vaccine despite concerns that it is derived from aborted cells. Some U.S. faith leaders have expressed moral concerns about Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine.

Buffalo.edu

Federal health officials are expected to approve distribution of a new COVID-19 vaccine developed by Johnson & Johnson. "This could be a game changer," said Dr. Nancy Nielsen, Senior Associate Dean for Health Policy at UB's Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.


Buffalo.edu

Researchers around the world are searching for a vaccine to counter the COVID-19 pandemic. Some of those studies are happening nearby. "We are really lucky to live in an area where cutting-edge research is really pushing science to deal with this pandemic," said Dr. Nancy Nielsen, Senior Associate Dean for Health Policy at UB's Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Two vaccine trials--for Johnson and Johnson, and Pfizer-- are taking place in Rochester. "UB is beginning a clinical trial of the Regeneron monoclonal antibodies. That's what was given to the President." Nielsen encourages those interested in helping to seek out available studies. 


Calling it an "industrywide conspiracy," Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced a lawsuit for the overprescription of opioids that he said has defrauded New Yorkers out of billions of dollars.


Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz said they are no better than a corner drug dealer. He was referring to corporate opioid makers. Poloncarz sees the county's lawsuits against them benefitting from an Oklahoma judge's ruling this week that Johnson & Johnson intentionally played down the risks, oversold the benefits of the drugs and must pay $572 million.

Updated at 7:04 p.m. ET

An Oklahoma judge has ruled that drugmaker Johnson & Johnson helped ignite the state's opioid crisis by deceptively marketing painkillers, and must pay $572 million to the state.

Oklahoma sought $17.5 billion, blaming Johnson & Johnson for fueling the crisis that has claimed the lives of more than 6,000 people in the state.

Federal prosecutors late Tuesday charged British drugmaker Indivior with felony fraud and conspiracy for its marketing of opioid products including Suboxone. The company allegedly created a "nationwide scheme" in the U.S. designed to convince doctors and government insurance providers that Indivior's patented opioid medications are safer and less prone to abuse than cheaper generic alternatives.