NAFTA

Canada and Mexico are dealing with lingering hard feelings over last summer's surprise Mexican trade deal with the United States as their new continental trade pact awaits a final stamp of political approval.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

The Buffalo Niagara Partnership delivered its annual list of wants and needs Thursday to a very different political environment.

Updated at 8:25 a.m. ET

President Trump, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto signed the new U.S. Mexico Canada Agreement — or USMCA — in Buenos Aires Friday, using the backdrop of the G-20 Summit to resolve a trade dispute between America and its closest neighbors.

WBFO file photo

President Donald Trump on Monday hailed a tentative agreement involving the United States, Canada and Mexico that would replace the North American Free Trade Agreement. While it's not yet a done deal, early local feedback suggests an updated deal will be especially good for New York State's economy, especially in agriculture.


Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

The U.S. and Canada reached a deal to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement, signed a quarter-century ago, with a new pact that the Trump administration says is easier to enforce.

In remarks in the Rose Garden formally announcing the agreement, President Trump called it "the most important trade deal we've ever made by far."

Ahead of a midnight deadline set by the White House, Trump approved changes that essentially revamp the 1993 NAFTA deal, bringing Canada on board after Mexico had already agreed in August.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada will not sign onto a North American Free Trade Agreement that does not include a dispute resolution mechanism and exemptions for cultural industries. Trudeau says the dispute resolution mechanism in Chapter 19 ensures trade rules are followed.

Trump's NAFTA announcement prompts mixed reactions

Aug 28, 2018
Chris Caya / WBFO News

President Trump's trade announcement has drawn mixed reactions. For some leaders, the fact that Mexican and U.S. negotiators worked out their differences is encouraging. It is a sign that the United States and Canada will be able to do the same. However, others say the deal with Mexico could be disastrous for the U.S.-Canada relationship.

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

The United States and Mexico have reached an "understanding" on several critical trade issues following bilateral talks to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement. They will now likely re-engage with Canada to reach a final deal on NAFTA, a primary goal of the Trump administration.

Speaking at the White House on Monday, President Trump said he wanted to change the NAFTA name to the U.S. Mexico Free Trade Agreement. He also reframed the negotiations as two bilateral trade deals.

Updated at 11:23 p.m. ET

After one White House adviser said there was "a special place in hell" for foreign leaders like Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and another said Trudeau "stabbed us in the back," Canadian leaders offered a measured — even polite — response.

Updated at 8:18 p.m. ET

The Trump administration's latest move to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from the U.S.'s biggest strategic and trade partners has touched off a barrage of criticism and retaliation.

US-Canada trade: Is anything really “foreign”?

Mar 19, 2018

Trade talk between Canada and the United States has been heating up lately. North American Free Trade Agreement re-negotiations continue with reports of mixed success.

Canada faces angry Americans in pivotal 6th round of NAFTA

Jan 22, 2018

Canada will be hosting an annoyed and angry United States as the sixth round of talks in the North American Free Trade Agreement renegotiation unfold over the coming week.

There are a lot of uncertainties in trade, from the North American Free Trade Agreement to its effects on cities and rural areas. One corporate veteran shared his insight at a recent annual meeting of the World Trade Center Buffalo Niagara.

Buffalo Area Warily Eyes The Renegotiation Of NAFTA

Oct 29, 2017

Shortly after World War II, a young Buffalo company — Speed Motor Express — began transporting commercial freight around western New York.

As it weathered the ups and downs of the local economy over the decades, the company slowly expanded its fleet of trucks.

Then in 1994, the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, expanded trade among the United States, Canada and Mexico. Buffalo faces Canada along the Niagara River.

President Trump made his view of the North American Free Trade Agreement very clear during the presidential election. He called NAFTA "the worst trade deal in ... the history of this country." And Trump blamed NAFTA for the loss of millions of U.S. manufacturing jobs.

His administration is in the midst of renegotiating the free trade deal with Canada and Mexico, and that is making many U.S. farmers and ranchers nervous.

President Donald Trump is again threatening to pull the United States out of the North American Free Trade Agreement. And once again, a local international business development organization is recommending the White House avoid that.


Less than one week into the renegotiation of NAFTA and Donald Trump has already threatened to blow up the agreement.

Officials from the U.S., Mexico and Canada met Wednesday to begin renegotiations of the North American Free Trade Agreement. In an opening statement, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer praised President Trump for the fact that these negotiations were even happening.

"American politicians have been promising to renegotiate NAFTA for years, but today, President Trump is going to fulfill those promises," he said.

Trump's NAFTA Makeover Not So Extreme

Aug 15, 2017

The Trump administration on Wednesday will start to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico. And despite very tough talk about NAFTA during the campaign, it appears the administration has backed away from a major assault on the decades-old trade deal.

And that is a relief to businesses in all three countries.

During the presidential campaign, Donald Trump clearly tapped into frustration about workers who had lost jobs in manufacturing. And he painted NAFTA as one of the central villains responsible for stealing Americans jobs.

The Trump administration has released its broad goals for a new North American Free Trade Agreement, but the language is mostly vague and offers just enough clues to point to potentially tough negotiations ahead.

The Trump administration has set into motion the process to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, following through on the president's earlier promise.

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer formally notified congressional leaders in a letter Thursday that the president intends to launch negotiations with Canada and Mexico "as soon as practicable."

WBFO file photo

During Monday's meeting in Washington between Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and President Donald Trump, the latter hinted that he'd like to "tweak" the North American Free Trade Agreement. Locally, economic leaders on both sides of the US-Canada border say NAFTA has proven to be beneficial to this side of the Niagara and shouldn't be overhauled.


Clarence Congressman Chris Collins is calling for the United States to broker a bilateral deal with Canada as opposed to updating the three-party North American Free Trade Agreement.

Rhetoric dismissing international trade deals has been a central theme for President-elect Donald Trump. While the future of such agreements remains in question, some local officials are arguing the benefits of one trade deal: the North American Free Trade Agreement.


WBFO file photo

Trade is good for the United States and its workers. That was the message delivered Thursday night to the World Trade Center Buffalo Niagara.

WBFO Albany Correspondent Karen DeWitt

Foreign trade deals are a contentious issue at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Now New York’s Senior Senator Chuck Schumer is weighing in, saying he is against the Trans Pacific Partnership proposal, known as the TPP.

Every day, thousands of people go back and forth across the U.S. border with Canada and a few try to do it illegally. For those who want to come here to work or to stay, there are legal procedures.