National/International

Anti-terrorism police investigating knife attack in Paris

Sep 25, 2020

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Updated at 1:47 p.m. ET

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lay in state Friday at the U.S. Capitol, the first woman and the first Jewish person to be given that honor in the nation's history.

Updated Sept. 28 at 10:27 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is appealing a federal court order that calls for it to abandon last-minute changes to the 2020 census schedule.

The preliminary injunction issued Thursday by U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh in the Northern District of California suspends Sept. 30 as the revised end date for tallying the country's residents.

VIDEO: Saying Goodbye To RBG

Sep 25, 2020

YouTube

As mourners gathered at the Supreme Court to pay their respects to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, we asked them to reflect on the impact she had on their lives.

Belarus opposition leader: 'We are fighting for the future of our children'

Sep 24, 2020

Svetlana Tikhanovskaya was almost the next president of Belarus. 

Last month, she ran for the nation's highest office despite having no political experience. She joined the race after her husband, Sergei Tikhanovsky, who was previously a presidential candidate himself, was detained on charges of inciting violence ahead of the Aug. 9 presidential election. Tikhanovskaya's platform was for Belarus to release political prisoners, including her husband and other political candidates, and to hold new free and fair elections.

When reporting on climate change, most of the news is pretty bleak.

Related: The world is watching: 2020 US election will have a big impact on global climate politics

It's fall 2020, and the presidential campaign in the US is happening against the backdrop of extreme weather events the world over.

In the US, wildfires are burning — fueled in part by hotter, drier conditions out West. Hurricanes are plaguing the Caribbean. And the Arctic is seeing its second-lowest ice cover ever.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Updated at 11:01 a.m. ET

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is lying in repose at the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday and Thursday, a two-day event honoring a justice who was both a cultural and legal icon.

As Ginsburg's casket arrived at the high court, former law clerks lined the Supreme Court steps. Supreme Court police officers served as pallbearers. Then the justice's family, close friends and members of the court held a brief ceremony in the court's Great Hall.

Trade wars, diplomatic squabbles, journalist visas canceled, name-calling. With each passing week, the relationship between the US and China seems to get more contentious. 

And all of this has added stress for many binational Chinese and American couples who are now asking why their countries can’t get along. 

William Wang and his partner Kit Mention have been together for about a year. The pair met on Tinder.

"Actually, on the first date, I stood him up,” Mention says. “After one week, he contacted me again, and so we went out for dinner.”

A car rumbles over a dirt road through an apocalyptic-looking scene in Encontro das Águas State Park in Brazil's Pantanal, the world’s largest, tropical wetland.

Fires engulf the forest while thick, black smoke fills the air. A sick, red orb of a sun hangs on the horizon watching over the destruction, a recent video shows.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

WBFO file photi

 A woman suspected of sending an envelope containing the poison ricin, which was addressed to White House, has been arrested at New York-Canada border, three law enforcement officials told The Associated Press on Sunday.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Across much of Europe, the Middle East and beyond, the coronavirus appears to be making a resurgence, and countries are making tough choices that challenge officials to do what’s best for public health. Many leaders are loath to pay a political and economic price for renewed lockdowns. But such tightened restrictions appear to be the logical next step at a time when growing clusters of COVID-19 cases have returned with no mercy.

Lorena Cantarovici recalls when she arrived in the United States from Argentina nearly 20 years ago. 

“I came here with $300 and a backpack,” she said.

In the US, she worked in several restaurants and fell in love with the industry. She also realized she missed food from her native Argentina — so she thought about opening her own business making empanadas. That idea turned into Maria Empanada, a small restaurant chain with five locations around Denver. 

When graduate student Dipo Oyeleye heard the song "We Go Win (Corona)" by Cobhams Asuquo, a Nigerian singer-songwriter, he knew what his next research project would be: a study of the myriad coronavirus songs that flourished in Africa at the pandemic's onset on the continent. 

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

President Donald Trump hosted Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and foreign ministers of two Arab Gulf states on Tuesday.

They were at the White House to sign an agreement called the Abraham Accords, which will normalize relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain.

Since the deal’s announcement, Israel appears to be backing away from annexing the West Bank. At least for now. But for many Palestinians, that’s hardly a victory, prompting many to consider that it's time for new leadership. 

American writer Isabel Wilkerson began her latest book long before the police killing of George Floyd and long before many American conservatives took issue with the argument that systemic racism is at the heart of the problem of police brutality. 

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Trump, Biden battle for Latino vote in Arizona

Sep 15, 2020

This story is part of "Every 30 Seconds," a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

With just weeks left before the 2020 presidential election, both candidates are making a push for Arizona, particularly Latino voters in Arizona.

This story is part of "Every 30 Seconds," a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

On Tuesday, demonstrations against a hair care advertisement continued across South Africa, after the campaign was run online last week by Clicks, a major pharmaceutical, beauty and health retail chain. It prompted outrage on social media, with many people calling it racist.

The ad pictured a Black woman with curly hair that was labeled "dry," "damaged," "frizzy" and "dull."

On the other side, was an image of a white woman with blonde, straight hair. Hers was labeled "fine," "flat," and "normal."

The board overseeing Latin America and the Caribbean’s most important development bank is set to vote for a new president this weekend, amid controversy surrounding a candidate nominated by the Trump administration. 

The election could embroil the Inter-American Development Bank in its most heated succession contest ever. The bank loans more than $13 billion every year to fund social and infrastructure projects across the continent and will play a key role in funding the region’s economic recovery from the pandemic. 

When Daiara Tukano was growing up, she learned from her family what it meant to care for the natural world and look after the rich ecology of Indigenous peoples’ traditional lands.

“Indigenous peoples, in a general way, know that humankind is not the center of the universe. We learn with nature around us because we are a part of nature,” said Tukano, a human rights researcher who belongs to the Tukano people of Northern Brazil. 

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