National/International

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Turkey's parliament adopted a new social media law Wednesday that critics say will create a "chilling effect" on dissenting voices and freedom of expression

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Jonathan, an asylum-seeker from Haiti, has a collection of bus tickets from his trip last fall from Florida to the US-Canada border. The last bus dropped him off in Plattsburgh, New York, a little over 20 miles from Canada. Then, he took a taxi to the border. 

But he didn’t go to an official border crossing. Instead, he followed instructions from other asylum-seekers. 

“My friend sent me every [piece of] information,” said Jonathan, who asked to use only his first name because his asylum case is pending.

Lawmakers honor Rep. John Lewis before he lies in state at the U.S. Capitol.  Lewis, a civil rights icon, served in Congress for more than three decades.  

Event is scheduled to begin at 1 pm; video will stream when the services start.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

The White House is lifting a months-long ban on residents of New York state from taking part in a federal program to streamline passenger security checks at airports and international borders after the Department of Homeland Security admitted that it made false statements responding to a lawsuit brought by the state over the issue.

In 1864, a ship called the Mary Celestia, a Civil War blockade runner, sank off the coast of Bermuda.

About 150  years later, in 2011, divers visited the wreck and discovered something unusual: a bottle of perfume that was almost perfectly preserved, complete with the branding of a chic London parfumerie of the day. 

Families of missing persons across Mexico are calling on their federal government to step up their efforts in searching for and finding disappeared people. 

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Trader Joe's is getting rid of product names such as Trader José's, Arabian Joe's and Trader Ming's that critics say are racist and "perpetuates harmful stereotypes."

"We made the decision several years ago to use only the Trader Joe's name on our products moving forward," spokesperson Kenya Friend-Daniel told NPR by email. She added that the company "had hoped that the work would be complete by now but there are still a small number of products going through the packaging change and we expect to be done very soon."

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Israeli officials took quick action against the coronavirus this spring: They identified the threat quickly, closed the country's borders, and implemented a nationwide lockdown. 

Tasting the Nation with Padma Lakshmi

Jul 17, 2020

If you only know Padma Lakshmi from her role as host of Top Chef, get ready for a fascinating chat with a big thinker who really wants to help us understand the real value of the food we love, and the stories of the invisible people behind it. We talk about her series Taste the Nation on Hulu, we get into what really thrills her about what she eats, her theory on the relationship between Mexican and Indian food, parenting bicultural kids, and the food writers she admires most.

If one thing is clear about this teeny tiny new coronavirus, it’s that it has changed the world. Its mark is massive. But SARS-CoV-2 is still clouded in mystery, and front and center in this puzzle is understanding immunity.

Why do some people get sick, and others don’t? What mechanisms in the body can successfully fight off the SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease COVID-19, and what backfires?

“One of the important questions that we were trying to figure out is what sort of immunity is protective for SARS-CoV-2?”

This story is part of "Every 30 Seconds," a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

Brayan Guevara comes from a long line of educators: His mother is a college instructor, and his grandparents were teachers in Honduras. 

Now, Guevara is on the same path. The 19-year-old is a sophomore at Guilford Technical Community College in Greensboro, North Carolina, and wants to become a teacher.

Four men on motorcycles arrived outside of 47-year-old Husham al-Hashimi’s house in darkness on Monday.

When Hashimi, a prominent security expert in Iraq, pulled up in his car, one of the men approached the vehicle and started shooting. Then, the gunman ran back to his motorcycle and the group sped off.

Related: Before coronavirus, young Iraqis held some of the biggest protests in the country's history

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

When Pakistani politician Tanzeela Qambrani introduced a resolution to the Sindh Assembly condemning George Floyd’s death, she carried with her a photo of him.

Qambrani’s ancestors were enslaved by traders; she’s a fourth-generation African and says that background has made her feel connected to Floyd, and the activism his tragic killing has inspired.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

For the past four years, Reyna Isabel Alvarez Navarro has reported to work at a crawfish processing plant in Crowley, Louisiana, bundled in two pairs of pants, two sweaters and a hat. She spent her days inside a freezing room where up to 100 employees worked elbow to elbow peeling crawfish. 

The cold, crowded conditions weren’t new for the 36-year-old seasonal worker from northern Mexico. But it turned out to be the perfect setting for the novel coronavirus to spread: This spring, several dozen workers in the plant fell ill with COVID-19, including Alvarez Navarro. 

Christoph Beuttler, carbon dioxide removal manager and policy expert at Climeworks, said that since the company started 11 years ago in Zurich, it has faced plenty of pushback.

Climeworks is one of the first and best-known companies to direct air capture — or pull carbon dioxide directly out of ambient air for storage or use, which can help lower emissions in the atmosphere. 

Kim Eun-joo, 37, grew up in the mountains of North Korea’s Hamgyong Province, near the border with China. By North Korean standards, her family was well off, working as currency traders.

But 14 years ago, Kim defected to the South. Now, she lives in the capital, Seoul, and is studying journalism at a local university.

Last year’s fires in the Amazon captured the world’s attention. They raged across Brazil, engulfing the recently deforested Amazon jungle. Smoke darkened São Paulo’s skies more than a thousand miles away.

Ranchers, loggers and businessmen in the state of Pará organized simultaneous illegal blazes last year on Aug. 10, which they called “the day of fire.” It jump-started the wave of fires across the Amazon.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

When Al Yarubiyah border crossing was closed in January, 1.4 million Syrians were cut off from outside help, aid groups say. 

Al Yarubiyah connects northeastern Syria with northern Iraq. It was one of five official border crossings to get humanitarian aid into northern Syria.

Related: US targets Assad govt and backers with toughest sanctions yet against Syria

Pumas roaming the empty streets of Santiago in Chile. Dolphins in the unusually calm waters off of Trieste Italy. Jackals roaming city parks in Tel Aviv in broad daylight.

The lockdowns on human movement during the pandemic have also changed the way wildlife is behaving.

Two years ago, after living in the United States for more than two decades, Madai Zamora headed to the airport in Charlotte, North Carolina, and boarded a one-way  flight to Mexico.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

This year marks 20 years since the US first made a historic commitment to ending modern slavery.

Updated at 8:49 a.m.

The world is about to hit a devastating milestone: half a million people dead, killed by the coronavirus pandemic that has swept the planet.

Pages