Niagara Square protests

Kyle S. Mackie/WBFO News

Buffalo Mayor Byron Brown said Thursday that an investigation is underway into the hit-and-run perpetrated by the driver of a pickup truck who sped into a crowd of protestors in Niagara Square Wednesday night.

Thomas O'Neil-White / WBFO News

A group of protesters occupying Niagara Square was met by Buffalo police officers as they marched from downtown Buffalo to Mayor Byron Brown’s residence Wednesday evening. 


Thomas O'Neil-White/WBFO news

A breezy Wednesday morning at Niagara Square in downtown Buffalo was devoid of any tents. Much of the spray adorning the fountain at the center of the square had been scrubbed away. 

WBFO file photo

The attorney for Martin Gugino, the 75-year-old protester who was injured after a push and fall during an encounter with Buffalo Police June 4, says her client continues to recover but is not yet ready to leave the hospital.

Courtesy of Buffalo Spree

After a one month absence because of coronavirus, Buffalo Spree returned with a June print edition. The magazine arrived in subscribers mailboxes just as daily protests against police brutality began in Buffalo. In this week's Press Pass with WBFO's Mark Scott, Spree Editor Elizabeth Licata says she expects the upcoming July issue will profile some of the activists pushing for police reforms.


Twitter/@ophiryotam

Last week's tweet by President Donald Trump about a Buffalo activist, injured after being pushed and falling in Niagara Square, is just one example of a long-running history of media misinformation. A University at Buffalo expert on media effects, persuasion and misinformation discussed the ongoing trend of spreading false narratives, and offers pointers for better judgment while warning that misinformation will only escalate with a tense presidential election coming.


Michael Mroziak/WBFO News

Flanked by representatives of the Free The People WNY Coalition, Common Councilmembers, members of Buffalo Police Department and two National Football League players, Mayor Byron Brown announced a series of changes in the city's police policy while vowing that conversations to address social inequity have only just begun.

WBFO/Mike Desmond

The President of the United States tweeted Tuesday morning, without providing evidence, that Buffalo activist Martin Gugino "could be an ANTIFA provocateur." Donald Trump also raised questions about Gugino's fall during last Thursday's protest in Niagara Square, and whether he was trying to disrupt police equipment.

Kyle S. Mackie/WBFO News

A week after protests began in Buffalo over the police killing of George Floyd, one of the largest crowds yet gathered in Niagara Square Saturday evening to call for concrete police reforms.

Kyle Mackie / WBFO News

The shoving of a 75-year-old protestor in Niagara Square on Thursday has drawn attention and criticism from around the world. Mayor Byron Brown is now responding to how the Buffalo Police Department handled the incident, and what it means for the community going forward.

Left: Courtesy of Emily Foschio; Right: Courtesy of Mary Miller

As protests and riots sparked by the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis on Memorial Day continue to sweep the country, Buffalo parents are weighing in about how they’re talking to their children about disturbing events in the news—and race.


Following Saturday's protest at Niagara Square and the ensuing vandalism, officials in a variety of government capacities blamed the unrest on the presence of "outside agitators," non-locals whose sole intent was to create tension and violence. The dialogue prompted Jim Heaney to pen a column at Investigative Post which took exception with the claims. Heaney believes the term was used to steer the community conversation away from how local government has failed to combat the city's structural racism.


Courtesy of Madison Carter/WKBW

Thousands of Western New Yorkers tuned into Madison Carter’s coverage of the protest against police brutality in Buffalo for WKBW-TV on Saturday. In conversation with WBFO, Carter speaks out about being one of the only Black reporters on the scene and her fight for greater newsroom diversity across the city.


Michael Mroziak, WBFO

Police and prosecutors say a 20-year-old Buffalo man is the one who tossed a flaming object through a broken City Hall window during Saturday night demonstrations in Niagara Square that, hours after an original protest, turned violent and destructive. Courtland Renford faces both state and federal counts.

BlackLoveResistsInTheRust.org

Saturday's protest in Niagara Square may have been prompted by the Minneapolis death of George Floyd, but one observer believes the message should be absorbed by local officials. "The children took the street," was how Marielle Smith of Black Love Resists in the Rust characterized the evening's events. That energy, Smith contends, is focused on bringing change to the Buffalo police department.


Downtown Buffalo's protest Saturday night, like those in so many other cities across the nation and the world, was sparked by last week's death of George Floyd, who was suffocated by a Minneapolis police officer. Rev. Mark Blue, President of the Buffalo branch of the NAACP, says the protests show the need for  change in how police perform their duties.