nursing homes

Tom Dinki/WBFO file photo

New York nursing homes will be required to put nearly three quarters of their money toward caring for residents, as a nursing home profit cap was included in the 2021 New York State budget.

Tom Dinki/WBFO file photo

Nursing home finances have come under scrutiny during the COVID-19 pandemic. Now the New York State Legislature is considering a measure to limit how much nursing homes can profit, which proponents say will mean better care for residents and opponents say will just harm the industry.

 

 

  

Schofield Adult Day Health Care

Adult Day Health Care, which provides medical services and socialization to disabled adults of all ages, will be allowed to reopen in New York state after a year-long closure. The New York State Department of Health issued guidance Thursday evening allowing Adult Day Health Care, or ADHC, to resume in-person services as soon as April 1. 

 


Karen DeWitt / WBFO Albany Correspondent

Critics of some of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s nursing home policies during the COVID-19 pandemic marked the anniversary of the controversial March 25, 2020 order that required the homes to take back from hospitals residents who were ill with the disease. They said an ongoing federal probe does not go far enough in investigating all that may have gone wrong in the governor’s management of nursing homes during the pandemic. 

Yuki Iwamura / AP Photo

A controversial state law in New York that granted special legal protections to nursing homes, hospitals, and other health care providers could be repealed under a bill approved Wednesday by the state Legislature.

Office of the Governor

A new Siena College poll out Monday offers some hope for the political survival of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who has seen most elected Democrats in New York call for his resignation over sexual harassment and nursing home scandals.

Mike Groll / AP

A longtime adviser to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo leading the state's COVID-19 vaccine rollout has been calling county executives to gauge their loyalty to the Democratic governor amid a sexual harassment investigation, according to reports in The Washington Post  and The New York Times.

Health officials have relaxed federal COVID-19 guidance for nursing homes for the first time since September, recommending that even unvaccinated visitors and residents be allowed to meet in person under most circumstances.

Tom Dinki/WBFO News

Calls are growing for Gov. Andrew Cuomo to resign in light of allegations of sexual harassment and a cover-up of nursing home deaths. Now New York Republicans are preparing for that possibility and trying to put the microscope on the person who would succeed Cuomo: the lieutenant governor and Buffalo native Kathy Hochul.


Office of the Governor

The New York State Legislature on Friday voted to end Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s emergency powers granted to him during the COVID-19 pandemic, as the governor faces new developments on two controversies: sexual harassment charges and his handling of nursing homes during the health crisis.

The New York State Senate and Assembly plan on Friday to strip Gov. Andrew Cuomo of sweeping emergency powers enacted under the COVID-19 pandemic.

Darren McGee / Office of Gov. Andrew Cuomo

Top aides to Gov. Andrew Cuomo altered a state Health Department report to obscure the true number of people killed by COVID-19 in the state's nursing homes, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times reported late Thursday.

Dan Clark / WMHT

Monday marked the one-year anniversary of the first confirmed coronavirus case in New York. Since then, over 38,000 New Yorkers have died from COVID-19 and more than 1.5 million who were sickened. At this point last year, though, nobody imagined what was in store.

Tom Dinki/WBFO file photo

New York lawmakers are looking to pass sweeping nursing home reforms this legislative session in light of COVID-19. One piece of legislation that predates the pandemic is a safe staffing bill, which would mandate nursing homes meet minimum staffing-to-patio ratios. 


New York State Legislature

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his staff were in damage control mode Thursday as they faced two scandals: the governor’s handling of nursing home policies during the COVID-19 pandemic and the months-long suppression of the true number of residents’ deaths, and allegations that Cuomo sexually harassed a former staffer.

Screenshot from Saturday Night Live / YouTube

For a time in 2020, Gov. Andrew Cuomo was considered one of the heroes of the COVID-19 pandemic for his steady and focused daily briefings when national leadership was lacking. But recently, the governor has suffered a reversal of fortune, as a scandal over the suppression of the number of nursing home deaths dominates news coverage of his administration. Additionally, a new poll finds the majority of New Yorkers now think the governor did something wrong.

Luann Thibodeau

Residents of nursing homes in New York state will be able to have visitors again, starting this Friday, Feb. 26, under new rules laid out by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and state health officials.

Southern Administrative Services

The Green House Project, a national network of small nursing homes, has received plenty of attention for its low rates of COVID-19 during the pandemic. A University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study recently called it a “promising model” for the reinvention of nursing homes in a post-pandemic world.

 

But just how replicable is it? Providers and advocates say there are still plenty of financial hurdles to cross before more nursing homes look like Green House homes. 

 

  

Beth Adams/WXXI News

COVID-19 has killed over 13,000 nursing home residents in New York state alone, and about a third of all U.S. COVID deaths have been linked to skilled nursing facilities. But a group of small nursing homes, including a facility near Rochester, have fared better against the virus than their larger, more traditional counterparts. 

 

 


Darren McGee / Office of the Governor

The New York State Senate is poised to strip Gov. Andrew Cuomo of some of his emergency pandemic powers and add an oversight commission to review the decisions the governor makes.

Office of the Governor

Over his long career, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has been known as a brutal, even vindictive political opponent, quick to retaliate against people who oppose his agenda or challenge him publicly.

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

Unions representing nursing home employees are urging Albany lawmakers to support reforms that, they say, would create greater transparency among operators, and require more investment back into staffing and direct care. Pickets and silent vigils were held at nursing homes and other long-term care facilities across New York State Thursday to raise awareness and support.

Office of the Governor

Gov. Andrew Cuomo launched an attack on one of the critics of his nursing home policies: Assemblymember Ron Kim, who lost his uncle to COVID-19 in a nursing home. Cuomo said Kim’s disagreements over nursing home policies is really about an old feud over a bill to regulate nail salons.

Darren McGree/Office of Gov. Andrew Cuomo

Gov. Andrew Cuomo spent most of his COVID-19 briefing Monday defending his administration’s handling of nursing homes, but, amid growing scrutiny over his own actions, he also for the first time endorsed limiting how much nursing homes can profit over resident care.

 


Darren McGee/Office of Gov. Andrew Cuomo

Gov. Andrew Cuomo broke days of silence over escalating accusations that he and his top aides deliberately withheld for months key COVID-19 death numbers of nursing home residents who succumbed to the virus. He apologized to families of residents who died in the homes during the pandemic for the anxiety that the withholding of those numbers created.

New York State Senate Republicans

Republicans in the New York State Legislature, in their effort to investigate Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s handling of COVID-19 in nursing homes, are turning to a somewhat unlikely ally: President Joe Biden.

 


Republican state senators and some family members of nursing home residents who died of COVID-19 say they are still looking for answers from Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration, one week after a scathing report from the state’s attorney general that found twice as many nursing home residents died of the disease than what the state reported.

Albert Pautler

A state judge ordered New York's Department of Health to release records about nursing home residents who died of COVID-19 in a Wednesday ruling that said the agency's failure to do so already was a "violation" of New York's open government law.

Yuki Iwamura / AP

report from New York’s attorney general finds that Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration may have undercounted by as much as 50% the number of the state’s nursing home residents who died at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York last spring. The news has led the Republican leader of the state Senate to call for the state health commissioner’s resignation.

Tom Dinki/WBFO file photo

The New York State Attorney General’s Office report released Thursday, which found the state Department of Health may have underreported nursing home COVID-19 deaths by 50%, makes plenty of mentions about Western New York nursing homes’ struggle to provide personal protective equipment and follow infection protocols during the pandemic.

 

  

 

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