Paul Ryan

Updated at 3:00 p.m. ET

House Speaker Paul Ryan announced Wednesday that he will not seek re-election and will retire in January.

"You all know I did not seek this job," Ryan said, addressing reporters. "I took it reluctantly. ... I have no regrets."

Ryan, 48, cited wanting to be around his adolescent children more often.

"My kids aren't getting any younger," Ryan said, "and if I stay, they'll only know me as a weekend dad. That's it right there."

The Affordable Care Act's worst enemies are now in charge of the vast range of health coverage the law created. They're also discussing changes that could affect a wider net of employment-based policies and Medicare coverage for seniors.

Although Republicans failed last month in their first attempt to repeal and replace the ACA, President Donald Trump vows the effort will continue. And even if Congress does nothing, Trump has suggested he might sit by and "let Obamacare explode."

A partial repeal of Obamacare could leave 18 million people who have insurance today with no coverage one year later, according to an analysis by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

The report estimates that 32 million people would lose their insurance over 10 years.

On Wednesday, Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., goes before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions in his first grilling since he was nominated to lead the Department of Health and Human Services. This isn't an official confirmation hearing. That comes Jan. 24, before the Senate Finance Committee. But with outspoken senators such as Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., on the HELP committee, Price is certain to face tough questions.

Here are five things to look out for:

Obamacare

President Obama and Vice President-elect Mike Pence were both on Capitol Hill Wednesday, making competing cases for and against Obama's signature health care law. Republicans have promised to make repeal of the Affordable Care Act their first order of business, once they control both Congress and the White House.

Mike Desmond/WBFO News

House Speaker Paul Ryan had a successful fund-raiser last night, sponsored by Congressman Chris Collins. While he did not speak publicly during the brief visit, he reportedly raised $250,000.


House Speaker Ryan to appear in Buffalo for fundraiser

Aug 29, 2016
paulryan.house.gov

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan is coming to Western New York to appear in two scheduled fundraisers, one in Buffalo and the other in Rochester, to raise funds that will be used to boost Republican congressional candidates as the GOP rallies to keep its majority this November.


While accusations of plagiarism in Melania Trump's speech dominated the analysis of day one of the Republican Party Convention in Cleveland, Buffalo News Political Reporter Bob McCarthy says it was just one of many noteworthy events.


WBFO News

Next week’s election of Speaker of the House is all but a formality, according to Congressman Chris Collins.

WBFO News photo from PBS video of debate

For Erie County Republican Chairman Nick Langworthy, the debate between Vice President Joe Biden and Congressman Paul Ryan was a victory for the Republican -- a potentially valuable component in a close race.

Langworthy says the Ryan had a chance to show he knew the issues and could stand up against a veteran like Biden, including the troubled economy, which is a key issue in the race.

"Paul Ryan acquitted himself very well in this debate. He showed he's a man of substance and facts and those substance and facts carried the night," Langworthy told WBFO News.

The head of the State’s Republican Party predicts that the choice of Paul Ryan as Mitt Romney’s Vice Presidential candidate will be helpful in some portions of New York State.

New York’s GOP Chair Ed Cox says Ryan’s position as number two on the Republican ticket in November could aid the GOP congressional candidates around the state, who are already identified as strong fiscal conservatives.

“I think it’s going to play very well in New York State, “said Cox.