pearl harbor

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

The "Date Which Will Live in Infamy" was remembered, as it always is on December 7, at the Buffalo and Erie County Naval and Military Park. This year's edition of the Pearl Harbor Remembrance ceremony featured honors for two veterans who served on submarines in World War II and remarks from one of the officers aboard the soon-to-be-commissioned new USS Little Rock LCS9.


When the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga (then Aiko Yoshinaga) was a senior at Los Angeles High School.

She remembers the day the following spring that her principal took the Japanese students aside and said, "You're not getting your diplomas because your people bombed Pearl Harbor."

Japanese-American families on the West Coast were rounded up and sent to internment camps. Yoshinaga was worried that she would be separated from her boyfriend, so to the horror of her parents, Yoshinaga and her boyfriend eloped.

Seventy-five years after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, some Americans have never stopped believing that President Franklin Roosevelt let it happen in order to draw the U.S. into World War II.

"It's ridiculous," says Rob Citino, a senior researcher at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. "But it's evergreen. It never stops. My students, over 30 years — there'd always be someone in class [who'd say], 'Roosevelt knew all about it.'"

Naval & Military Park remembers Pearl Harbor Day

Dec 8, 2015
Michael Mroziak, WBFO

The so-called "date that shall live in infamy," December 7, 1941, was remembered in a brief and solemn ceremony at the Buffalo and Erie County Naval and Military Park on Monday afternoon.