PFOA

WAMC

New York State Thursday adopted maximum contaminant levels for three chemicals in drinking water. Environmental and community advocates wanted to see lower levels adopted, and more PFAS chemicals included, but say it’s a good start. One of the limits is a national first.

Zoom

Most of the focus has been on COVID-19, but advocates held a virtual meeting Tuesday to bring attention to another aspect of public health: protecting New York’s drinking water.

EPA inches toward PFAS drinking water regulation

Feb 25, 2020

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has taken the next step toward setting drinking water limits for two PFAS chemicals — PFOA and PFOS. Environmentalists say the step is small and they want to see quicker, bolder action.

Advocates for clean drinking water say proposed new limits by the state Health Department for chemicals in the water supply that are linked to cancer and other serious illnesses are too high and will lead to serious health problems.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has made two big announcements improving the quality of New York's drinking water - and environmental advocates are applauding the actions.

The state’s Drinking Water Quality Council has issued what it considers to be safe levels for exposure to toxic chemicals, including PFOAs and PFOS that have been found in high quantities in some of New York’s drinking water supplies.

A Bennington College survey of residents in the PFOA-contaminated village of Hoosick Falls in eastern New York finds higher rates of illnesses among residents exposed to the toxic substance than did a previous study conducted by the New York State Health Department.


Karen DeWitt

A former EPA administrator and a former New York state health department official have teamed up with a Vermont college to conduct a health survey of people potentially affected by polluted water in the villages of Hoosick Falls and Petersburgh, and in Bennington, Vermont.


EDnvironmental Advocates of New York

Environmental advocates are prodding state officials to take steps that would give New York residents the “constitutional right" to clean water and healthy air.

Governor  Andrew Cuomo’s health commissioner faced an intense grilling from lawmakers Wednesday at a joint hearing on how the administration handled water contamination in the eastern New York village of Hoosick Falls.


The New York State Senate is expected to soon announce a date for a hearing on how the Cuomo Administration handled drinking water contamination in Hoosick Falls. It comes as new studies out this week show more harmful effects from exposure to the chemical PFOA, on mothers and their children.


Karen DeWitt

High schoolers in Hoosick Falls say they are tired of the slow response by the adults in the community, and government, to toxic substance PFOA which has infiltrated the village water system and made it unsafe to drink.