Police Reform

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

A Breonna Taylor protest march winding its way back to Buffalo City Hall Wednesday evening was disrupted when a pickup truck drove through the crowd and drove away, leaving an injured legal observer on Niagara Square with apparent broken bones.

WBFO file photo

Buffalo Common Council members are working on a plan that would have the police department hire full-time mental health professional to aid officers on crisis calls. But they're not rushing to pass a resolution. In the meantime, it appeared following Tuesday's Council Legislation Committee meeting that the proposed police reform bill known as Cariol's Law might be brought to a vote the following week.

Buffalo Police Video

Police everywhere are looking for alternatives to an officer's service revolver. Buffalo Police say they are are now studying a device called a BolaWrap.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

A lot has happened in the week since Willie Henley, 60, was shot by a Buffalo Police officer during a mental health crisis call for help. And a lot more has to happen, according to the many voices who have spoken out about the shooting.


Mike Desmond / WBFO News

A beautiful late summer day and the quest for racial justice brought out a crowd to Martin Luther King Jr. Park Sunday, continuing the push for basic changes in the Buffalo Police Department.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

City Hall proposals to have social workers and mental health professionals help police in the collisions of law enforcement and people in crisis is drawing fire. Western New York Agents for Change said it is all a bad idea.

Ryan Zunner / WBFO News

It isn't clear whether former Buffalo Police Officer Cariol Horne will ever get her pension, but Common Councilmembers on Tuesday moved closer to using her name as a sign of reforming police operations.

City of Buffalo / Facebook

Street protests and the shooting of a mentally ill man on Saturday are heating up the relationship between Buffalo's Common Council and Mayor Byron Brown - but not in a good way.

City of Buffalo / Facebook

Starting in October, Buffalo Police will be calling for social workers trained to deal with acute mental health crises in 911 cases that vex law enforcement.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

Buffalo Mayor Byron Brown said there will be major changes in the way police deal with people who are dealing with mental illness, a change bargained with the Police Benevolent Association. But protesters said they not only want those changes, but a change in the mayor's office.

Against the advice of counsel, Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren said Thursday that she is suspending seven police officers involved in the death of 41-year-old Daniel Prude.

Earlier Thursday, City Council wrote a letter to Warren calling for the officers to be placed on administrative leave. The officers are suspended with pay, and Warren said she understood that the police union may sue the city over the move.

Thursday night was a tale of two groups with contrasting ideas on how to make change, clashing, after the death of Daniel Prude.

When Rochester police officers came upon Daniel Prude in the middle of Jefferson Avenue in the early morning hours of March 23, he was naked and in distress. The temperature hovered around freezing.

He had allegedly just gone on a destructive tear, according to police reports, smashing out the windows of several storefronts, and ranting about having the coronavirus. A passing tow truck driver who called 911 described Prude as being covered in blood.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

Buffalo Police are doing away with one of the most controversial elements of the war on drugs: no-knock warrants. That is the kind of police warrant where officers don't have to announce they are there and why. Instead, they just kick down the door and head in.

Jillian Forstadt / WSKG News

New York Republican Party Chairman Nick Langworthy and local Republican officials met Tuesday to back law enforcement officers ahead of the 2020 election.

Toronto Police Department

Toronto’s mayor has promised sweeping changes to the city’s police services. His announcement follows an Ontario Human Rights Commission report outlining strong anti-Black racism by Toronto Police.

WBFO file image

Niagara County lawmakers have approved the formation of a task force that will explore ways to reform the Sheriff's Office, and then submit a plan to Albany as required under a June executive order.

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

As part of the Buffalo Reform Agenda, Mayor Byron Brown announced a new round of changes in law enforcement, including how the city has levied fines against motorists.

Policing Women Part 2: When Black women are criminalized

Jul 21, 2020
Ruweyda Ahmed Salim / Facebook

While much of the national conversation about police reform has focused on race, gender also affects policing. Combine race and gender and you will find that women -- particularly Black women -- are being stopped by police much more often than two decades ago, and those stops are becoming much more troubling.

Becky Sullivan / NPR

While much of the national conversation about police reform has focused on race, gender also affects policing. Combine race and gender and you will find that women -- particularly Black women -- are being stopped by police much more often than two decades ago, and those stops are becoming much more troubling.

Office of the Governor

Law enforcement leaders and some Republicans in the New York State Legislature are pushing back against recent criminal justice reforms approved by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the Democratic-led Legislature. They say a recent uptick in violent crimes might mean the new laws went too far, and they would like to see the policies reversed.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

A Buffalo woman accused of driving her vehicle into three law enforcement officers has been granted a release from jail.

Ryan Zunner / WBFO News

The latest phase of Buffalo’s reform agenda includes three new initiatives that will adjust fees and fines on low-income city residents.

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

It's a policy New York City's mayor announced last week will be implemented in that city, the creation of a police discipline database. In Buffalo, Mayor Byron Brown was asked if he would consider a similar database.

City of Buffalo

This year's Juneteenth may spark more demonstrations than celebrations, as tensions remain high after the recent death of George Floyd and other African Americans during encounters with police. Juneteenth historically recalls that day in 1865 when the enslaved flooded the streets of Galveston, TX to celebrate their newly announced freedom. But its 2020 observance also begs a look at systemic racism in its modern form.


Updated at 5:00 p.m. ET

Senate Republicans unveiled legislation on Wednesday to address a national outcry for reform of the country's law enforcement departments, with hopes of acting on police misconduct, dangerous practices and concerns of systemic racism.

But Democrats say the proposal, which would encourage police departments to end such practices such as chokeholds and no-knock warrants but does not explicitly ban them, falls short.

Thomas O'Neil-White

Members of the Diocese of Buffalo expressed solidarity in prayer with people advocating for justice in the wake of the murder of George Floyd and subsequent protests.

Updated at 7:58 p.m. ET

The Republican-led Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday held its first hearing on policing since the May 25 death of George Floyd — a black man who was killed in custody by Minneapolis police — triggered a wave of protests and international outcry for reform of the U.S. police system.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

President Trump signed an executive order on Tuesday encouraging police departments to improve training — a step critics say falls short of what is needed to curb police officers' use of force against nonwhites.

The order comes as the president faces tremendous pressure to take action following the killing of George Floyd at the hands of police last month.

Ryan Zunner / WBFO News

Just days after ordering local governments and police to rework their models or lose state funding, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed additional pieces of legislation to reform police and law enforcement practices.

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