presidential debate

President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden met for their second and final debate as tens of millions of Americans have already voted. A deeply divided country begins its final sprint to Election Day amid the coronavirus pandemic, and it's unclear how many voters have yet to make up their minds.

Here are five takeaways from the debate in Nashville, Tenn., a much different — and far more civil — night than the last encounter.

Live: Trump-Biden Final Presidential Debate

Oct 22, 2020

President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden have their final debate Thursday night in Nashville.

Follow NPR's live coverage, including updates and fact checks.

Updated at 11:27 p.m. ET

In a unique political split screen, President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden appeared in competing town halls at the same time on Thursday night.

Among their notable answers, Trump declined to denounce the baseless QAnon conspiracy theory, while Biden said he would offer a more concrete answer on "court packing" before Election Day.

President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden have their first debate Tuesday night in Cleveland.

Fox News' Chris Wallace is moderating the event, scheduled to begin at 9 p.m. ET. Debate topics will include the coronavirus pandemic, the economy and the Supreme Court.

Follow NPR's live coverage, including updates and fact checks.

After a flawed Iowa caucus process, the Senate acquittal of President Trump and a dramatic State of the Union address — all in the past five days — Friday night brings the eighth Democratic presidential debate.

There are now no more official debates before Democrats begin voting.

Tuesday night's debate was the last before the Iowa caucuses on Feb. 3, and it featured six of the 12 remaining candidates — the top four of whom polls show to be neck and neck.

Democratic primary voters got a substantive debate in which the candidates clashed over what it means to be commander in chief, gender politics and, of course, health care.

Here are four takeaways from Tuesday night's debate:

Update at 3:30 p.m. ET

We're up to the seventh debate, and down to six candidates.

The leading Democratic presidential candidates return to the debate stage Tuesday at 9 p.m. ET — this time in Iowa, which hosts the first-in-the-nation caucuses in less than three weeks.

Listen to The NPR Politics Podcast here.

The impeachment of President Trump has dominated the news this week. But the political focus shifted to the Democratic presidential candidates Thursday night for their sixth debate, this one in Los Angeles and hosted by the PBS NewsHour and Politico.

The top seven Democratic presidential candidates will appear on stage in Los Angeles Thursday night in the sixth debate of the year.

The debate comes just one day after President Trump became the third president of the United States to be impeached by the House of Representatives.

Here's what you need to know:

The Democratic presidential candidates take the stage for the second round of debates Tuesday and Wednesday in Detroit. A lot is on the line for the candidates, who have been engaged in back-and-forths over race and health care coming into this round of debates.

On Tuesday, progressives Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren face off for the first time in this campaign. And several other candidates will be scrambling for a breakout night to get back on voters' minds.

Daemen.edu

While Wednesday's Presidential debate provided more of the harsh discourse that seems to have drawn millions of viewers to previous debates, the event failed to go deep on some key issues. Robert Mills, special assistant for government relations at Daemen College, believes the candidates failed to properly explain how they would improve the conditions for Erie County's 65,000 veterans.


buffalo.edu

For one analyst, it appears Donald Trump wants to fire up his loyal supporters in the final days of the Presidential race. UB's Jacob Neiheisel says Trump offered his base more "red meat" during Wednesday's debate. While the goal is to encourage voter turnout, the strategy may have the unintended consequence of bringing out Bernie Sanders supporters to vote for Hillary Clinton.


Third presidential debate fact-check

Oct 19, 2016

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate Wednesday night at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. 

As Donald Trump rails about a rigged election, he continues to drift from the message that originally boosted his candidacy. That's the view of Buffalo News Political Reporter Bob McCarthy, who believes Trump would be better served to emphasize his status as a political outsider who can be an agent of change in the White House.


The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is on Wednesday at 9 p.m. ET. It's the last chance either candidate will have to make a closing argument before tens of millions of voters.

It follows yet another unprecedented week in the campaign, in which Trump has repeatedly questioned the legitimacy of the election, predicting that it will be stolen from him through media bias and massive voter fraud.

NPR second presidential debate fact-check

Oct 9, 2016

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the second presidential debate Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.
    
NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

Follow highlights of the debate in NPR's updating news story at npr.org.

Buffalo.edu

Monday's Presidential debate may have been widely watched, but the event is unlikely to provide either candidate with a boost in polls. That's the opinion of UB Political Science professor Jacob Neiheisel. "I don't think the chains got moved a whole lot."


Mike Desmond/WBFO News

The presidential debate drew a good crowd to the North Park Theatre Monday night. Judging by those who were willing to talk afterwards, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton won the debate.


Local debate watcher weighs in

Oct 4, 2012
Photo/logo from University of Denver

Mainstream media and even some liberal commentators say Republican Mitt Romney was the clear winner in Wednesdsay night's Presidential debate against President Barack Obama. 

WBFO & AM-970's Eileen Buckley spoke with Republican political lobbyist Carl Calabrese, who says Romney won "hands down."

A nation "curious about Mitt Romney," says Buffalo News Political Reporter Bob McCarthy, could draw an estimated 50 million viewers for tonight's Presidential debate.

As polls show President Barack Obama inching his way to a solid lead, McCarthy believes voters still want to see Romney's debate performances before they make their final decision on Election Day.