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Facebook's latest foes: nearly every U.S. state. New York Attorney General Letitia James said Tuesday that a state-level antitrust investigation into the social network now has the backing of a bipartisan group of 47 attorneys general.

New York Civil Liberties Union

Lockport City Schools are testing a facial recognition system intended to spot potentially dangerous intruders, but state officials are among those raising privacy concerns.

National Public Radio

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg was praised by Rep. Chris Collins Wednesday during committee hearings looking at the social network's privacy issues and operations.

Updated at 7:35 p.m. ET

Mark Zuckerberg faced dozens of senators — and the American television audience — to take "hard questions" on how Facebook has handled user data and faced efforts to subvert democracy.

"We didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake. It was my mistake, and I'm sorry," the co-founder and CEO of Facebook, uncharacteristically wearing a suit, said in his opening remarks. "I started Facebook, I run it, and I'm responsible for what happens here."

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will face Congress in two separate hearings this week, as his company grapples with intense scrutiny over privacy and security on the social media site. It will be Zuckerberg's first appearance on Capitol Hill.

On Tuesday afternoon, more than 40 senators will crowd into a hearing room, where members of the Senate judiciary and commerce committees will have four minutes each to question Zuckerberg. A similar scene will play out Wednesday, when he is set to appear before members of House Energy and Commerce Committee.

National Public Radio

Imagine discovering a convicted sex offender video recording your children from the next yard. That is a crime, right? Not in New York State.

AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File

New York State is set to study the use of a device known as the “textalyzer,” which would allow police to determine whether a motorist involved in a serious crash was texting while driving.

President Trump is expected to sign into law a decision by Congress to overturn new privacy rules for Internet service providers.

Passed by the Federal Communications Commission in October, the rules never went into effect. If they had, it would have given consumers more control over how ISPs use the data they collect. Most notably, the rules would have required explicit consent from consumers if sensitive data — like financial or health information, or browsing history — were to be shared or sold.

The U.S. Senate has a lot going on: confirmation hearings for a Supreme Court nominee, negotiations on repealing the Affordable Care Act, votes on gun sales regulations and bear-hunting rules for Alaska.

File photo

A judge has reserved decision in a dispute over surveillance technology being used by the Erie County Sheriff's Department.

WBFO File Photo / WBFO News

President Obama issued a memorandum today regarding the collection of personal data through the use of drones.

WBFO File Photo

New York Senator Charles Schumer is moving to propose legislation that would limit the use of GPS trackers.

The Chautauqua Institution has scored quite a coup for week three of the summer season.  Former New York Times editor Jill Abramson will speak at the Amphitheater Wednesday morning as part of this week's theme, "The Ethics of Privacy." 

Border info sharing program raising privacy concerns

Jan 28, 2014
WBFO News file photo

The Toronto Star is reporting that by this summer, Washington and Ottawa will be sharing information on people traveling across the border. The report is raising privacy concerns.