public financed campaigns

Karen Dewitt / WBFO Albany Correspondent

A commission designing a public campaign finance system for the state’s political races is poised to limit fusion voting, or the ability for candidates to run on multiple party lines. Now the leader of the State Senate is saying that it would be better if the commission leaves it alone.


A New York commission formed to come up with a plan to publicly finance state election campaigns will hold a special meeting on Columbus Day.


Tempers flared at a public hearing of a commission formed to enact a public campaign financing system for New York. But the tensions centered not on that proposal, but on the commission's decision to consider whether to end fusion voting, which allows candidates to run on multiple ballot lines.


The first meeting of the commission created to devise a public campaign finance system for New York's political races is scheduled for Wednesday. Advocates hope the commission, which has been slow to start, will start taking steps toward a final report due in December.


Photo from bobantonacci.com

The only statewide candidate who is participating in a pilot public campaign finance program says it’s been slow going, but Republican candidate for Comptroller Bob Antonacci expects to collect enough individual donors to qualify for the state matching funds.

Buffalo's Common Council is drawing some praise for looking into public financing of political campaigns.

One of the most controversial recommendations in Governor Cuomo’s anti-corruption commission report released this week is to enact public financing of campaigns for statewide elections, a proposal that will meet strong opposition.