Refugees

Dawne Hoeg

With Western New York still in the grasp of the coronavirus pandemic, a newly-resettled refugee family is getting into the spirit of the City of Good Neighbors. For Buffalo Toronto Public Media’s Making Buffalo Home initiative, WBFO’s Kyle Mackie reports on how an Afghan couple sparked a business venture that’s making face masks and generating income for refugee women.


Jericho Road

Buffalo's West Side is filled with people from everywhere, speaking languages from other countries and with an understanding of the world beyond most of us. Many wind up at Jericho Road Community Health Center for their health needs, from birth to death. And now, they have to deal with COVID-19 as families juggle no school, different languages and a health care system that can be hard to navigate for a native Buffalonian with good health coverage.

The matter is still being argued in litigation. But on Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court voted to allow the Trump administration to impose new rules on immigrants and use of public benefits, rules which may adversely affect the permanent residency status of some. In Buffalo, some who serve "New Americans" say most are not affected by the change but add that many are missing out on deserved benefits out of fear their status would change.

Joseph Celestin / Immigrant Defense Project

Immigration advocates gathered Tuesday in Albany to urge state lawmakers to pass a bill that would prohibit U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement from making arrests in and around local and state courthouses.

University at Buffalo

During this holiday season, many are enjoying family, friends and the joy of the time. A University at Buffalo doctor is going into an area many are fleeing and doing good.

Kyle S. Mackie / WBFO News

Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz was threatened during a local radio program.

Kyle S. Mackie / WBFO News

Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz is sending a clear message to the Trump administration: Send more refugees here. Poloncarz and other county executives across the country are now required to opt-in to allow future refugee resettlement in their districts.


Mike Desmond / WBFO News

For an audience at Daemen College Thursday evening, it was a story of genocide, blood, 800,000 dead and a country trying to rebuild itself.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

Increasingly, the issues of the nation and the world are argued over in Buffalo's Niagara Square. On Sunday, it was a little of both as Iraqi refugees protested government security forces and allies shooting hundreds of people in the streets as they protested government corruption.

WNED | WBFO's Making Buffalo Home

Older refugees in Buffalo face challenges that younger refugees circumvent. Although services are prolific for this community, they are not always as accessible due to certain barriers. Those barriers make it sometimes impossible for them to utilize the available resources.


Courtesy of WEDI

Buffalo's popular West Side Bazaar, an incubator for immigrant and refugee-run businesses, is moving from its current home on Grant Street to a larger space on Niagara Street.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

The continuing national turmoil about immigration and the U.S. southern border drew a large crowd Wednesday night to St. Joseph University Church for an interfaith service.

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

Buffalo residents who came to the region as refugees and representatives of agencies who support local resettlement efforts gathered Friday to rally and urge the greater public to speak out in opposition to a reported proposal by the Trump Administration to reduce - or even zero out - refugee admissions next year.

Kyle S. Mackie/WBFO News

It might still be more than a month away for kids, but some adults went back to school this week. It was the start of the Buffalo Public Schools’ summer semester of English classes for individuals aged 21 and older.


The House Democratic leadership pushed through a $4.5 billion emergency aid package late Tuesday to help thousands of migrants packed into overcrowded facilities at the U.S.-Mexico border, but it's unlikely to get a hearing in the Republican-controlled Senate.

Updated at 5:07 p.m. ET

The acting commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection plans to step down in the coming weeks, according to two agency officials, amid a public furor over the treatment of migrant children in U.S. facilities.

John Sanders is expected to make his resignation effective July 5, according to the officials, who spoke to NPR on condition of anonymity because an official announcement had not been made to agency employees.

Jericho Road

One hundred immigrants from the Democratic Republic of the Congo are here to seek asylum in the United States.


Ryan Zunner/WBFO News

Much of the current focus on immigration into the United States remains on the country’s southern border. But in Buffalo, a local organization continues to serve as a beacon of hope for individuals and families fleeing war-torn and unstable nations.


Karen Dewitt / WBFO Albany Correspondent

Democrats in the state Assembly say they plan to move ahead with a bill to grant driver’s licenses to undocumented immigrants in New York. However, the Assembly speaker said he wants to educate people about the benefits of the measure first.

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

The Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo is hosting a visiting exhibit created by a Burmese artist who, along with hundreds of subjects he has met through his project, are former political prisoners in their homeland. His exhibit, a Show of Hands, features plaster casts of each former prisoner's hand. Some of them are of individuals who have since settled in Buffalo after spending years as refugees.

Chris Thomas / WNED

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has written a letter to U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo, asking the State Department to maintain refugee resettlement sites in Buffalo.

Federal Appeals Court Deals Trump Another Setback On DACA

Nov 9, 2018

Updated at 11 p.m. ET

A federal appeals court in California has blocked the Trump administration from immediately terminating an Obama-era program protecting from deportation young immigrants brought illegally to the U.S. as children.

Chris Thomas / WNED

The Trump administration's decision to slash the annual cap on refugees to the United States is starting to have an effect on chronically struggling, shrinking cities such as Buffalo.

Lynne Bader / WNED-TV

When did immigration to the United States become illegal? That is the question many people may wonder, as the Trump Administration toughens restrictions on undocumented Americans. As Latin American scholar and author Aviva Chomsky told an audience Thursday evening at Trinity Church of Buffalo, excluding non-white immigrants is a long tradition.

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

It was the last day of computer coding class Friday for dozens of teen girls, all of whom came to Buffalo as immigrants or refugees.


With the United States dealing with what many call an immigration crisis, a church in Buffalo is making an artistic statement on the divisive issue.

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

Several community organizations who serve local refugees and immigrants are uniting to denounce the Supreme Court decision upholding President Trump's travel ban from seven nations, including five featuring Muslim-majority populations.

At the New York City cellphone shop where he does his homework, 9-year-old Ahmed Alhuthaifi says he misses his mom a lot.

"Sometimes, I feel like I am going to cry," he says. "Trump won't let her in."

After a years-long effort, his mother, who is stuck in Saudi Arabia, was denied a visa because of President Trump's restrictions on immigration and travel from certain countries, including Yemen. She and Ahmed's four younger siblings, who live with her, missed Ahmed's birthday celebrations on April 3.

Buffalo Public Schools

Buffalo Public Schools have added so many immigrants to the student population, the district now has 84 languages spoken in the hallways and 125 teachers have been added to work with these students.

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

Catholic Charities hosted representatives of more than a dozen local businesses Tuesday. It was the not-for-profit agency's opportunity to say "thank you" for the willingness of those companies to provide jobs for some of Buffalo's resettled refugee population.


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