SCOTUS

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

Several community organizations who serve local refugees and immigrants are uniting to denounce the Supreme Court decision upholding President Trump's travel ban from seven nations, including five featuring Muslim-majority populations.

WBFO file photo

Supporters of organized labor were dealt a legal blow by the U.S. Supreme Court Monday, which ruled 5-to-4 that companies have the right to prohibit collective grievances by its workers. It raises the question: is this just the first blow organized labor may face by the nation's highest court this spring?


In a hearing that stretched through nearly 12 hours Tuesday, the Supreme Court nomination of Neil Gorsuch took a long step toward Senate confirmation.

Barring an utterly unforeseen reversal when the questioning resumes Wednesday, observers expect Judiciary Committee approval along party lines on April 3 and a similar win on the Senate floor.

Twenty senators took turns asking questions for half an hour each. The Republicans tried to get the country to share their affinity for the nominee. The Democrats tried to tie him to President Trump.

Karen Dewitt

New York’s politicians and major health care providers are applauding the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold President Obama’s health care law.  Meanwhile, an Albany Law School expert says Chief Justice John Roberts may have been concerned about his legacy, and that was a factor in his decision.