sports journalism

courtesy of Bob DiCesare

For former Buffalo News sportswriter Bob DiCesare, the outbreak of the coronavirus has forced him to continue his stay in Florida for an additional two months. He wasn't complaining, especially about the weather, but admitted, "I'm itching to get home." In an hour-long interview with WBFO, the Western New York native had plenty to say about the state of journalism, the changes at his former employer and his passion for fishing the streams, rivers and lakes of the region.


Jay Moran/WBFO

Often painful and dramatic, change continues for the newspaper industry. Fueled by the internet, consumers have rushed to information outlets beyond their city’s daily print publication. Sportswriter Tim Graham has worked through the whirlwind. Nominated three times for a Pulitzer Prize while at The Buffalo News, Graham’s work now exists exclusively in the digital world at The Athletic.


Jay Moran/WBFO

What does it say about a sportswriter who retired three years ago but spent a week this winter reporting on six different sporting events? “It’s still fun to go to games,” said Budd Bailey, who retired from the Buffalo News in 2017. “As I tell people, I’d like to think I see more games in Buffalo than anybody else in town.”  While he clearly hasn’t grown tired of sports after four decades of coverage, he did share concerns over how sports journalism may be losing out in a changing marketplace. 


Jay Moran/WBFO

Before the spread of COVID-19, when the country was still consuming sports at its typical, voracious rate, some of the area's best-known sportswriters visited WBFO for long conversations about the future of sports journalism. Different perspectives were shared, but each individual offered keen insights into how journalism is being devalued. "Sports is sports," said Jerry Sullivan, former senior sports columnist at the Buffalo News. "It worries me more in the real realm, in the news world, the way news is being consumed."