St. Lawrence River

Nick Lippa / WBFO News

After another year with record high lake levels, New York State has formed a multi-agency task force to come develop plans to strengthen infrastructure along Lake Ontario’s shoreline. The Resiliency and Economic Development Initiative Commission -- also known as REDI -- continues to meet with local municipalities. WBFO’s Nick Lippa attended Tuesday's meeting in Albion to see how the meetings are progressing.

Photo courtesy of Lamar Bliss

Flooding on Lake Ontario broke records this year. A lot of shoreline residents say they’ve never seen water levels anywhere near this year's, but in fact Lake Ontario has flooded many times before.


Emily Russell

People along Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River continue to be anxious as water laps up on docks and decks across the region. The weekend’s rain didn’t help the situation.

Emily Russell

The Thousand Islands is a major tourist destination, but right now it's flooding. Water levels in the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario are higher than average and they’re expected to keep rising.

James Morgan

Major flooding in Canada is still slowing efforts to relieve high water in Lake Ontario through the St. Lawrence River.

File Photo / Lockport Police

Nearly $3 million in additional relief funding is going to communities in five upstate New York counties along Lake Ontario to help them recover from last year's flooding.

WRVO News

The government body that regulates water levels on Lake Ontario is reducing the outflows to the St. Lawrence River. The International Joint Commission says water levels have dropped rapidly, down 12 inches since the peak in late May. However, that is drawing some criticism from shoreline residents who say the move is premature.

Additional efforts have been put into place to decrease flooding along Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River.

WBFO's Mike Desmond

For the fishing and tourism Village of Olcott on the Lake Ontario shore, Sunday was an opportunity to recover from the terrible weather of recent weeks.

File photo

A new report from Ontario paints a gloomy economic picture as a result of continued low water levels in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River. It could cost the U.S. and Canada more than $19 billion by the year 2050.