United Auto Workers

Ford Motor Plant

There were some cars in the Tonawanda Powertrain parking lot Sunday, but no picket lines outside along the plant periphery, as General Motors begins to crank up car and parts production after a nearly six-week strike across the country.

Updated at 6:08 p.m. ET

Some 40 days after United Automobile Workers walked off the job, picketing General Motors plants and grinding operations to a halt, the labor union's members have ratified the tentative deal their representatives struck with the automaker earlier this month. The UAW announced the deal's approval after voting ended Friday.

Employees will return to work as instructed by GM.

The contract was approved by 57.2%.

Thomas O'Neil-White

Despite torrential downpour conditions, striking General Motors workers were in good spirits standing outside of union headquarters on River Road in the Town of Tonawanda Wednesday afternoon with news that GM and the United Auto Workers union has reached a tentative agreement to end the strike.

General Motors and the United Auto Workers have reached a tentative agreement to end the strike that began one month ago, the labor union announced Wednesday. The UAW GM National Council will vote on the deal Thursday.

When the national council reviews the deal's terms, it will also decide whether nearly 50,000 workers should remain on strike or whether they should go back to work before the full membership ratifies the agreement.

With the UAW strike against General Motors in its fourth week, the automaker is losing millions of dollars. So are the businesses that supply GM. Many of their workers have also been out of work for four weeks, but unlike the striking UAW workers, their plight is much less visible.

Lansing, Mich., has nine regional GM suppliers. These are companies that do everything from producing ads to making parts for GM's cars and trucks. Altogether, that's more than 6,000 jobs. Supplier jobs in Lansing outnumber GM jobs.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

Contract talks aimed at ending a 21-day strike by the United Auto Workers against General Motors have taken a turn for the worse, hitting a big snag over product commitments for U.S. factories, a union official wrote in an email to members. 

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

If you traveled by the General Motors Powertrain plant in the Town of Tonawanda on Thursday, it looked like another day of United Auto Workers picketing, as bargaining continued in Detroit toward ending the longest strike in nearly a half-century. However, much more was going on.

United Auto Workers

Contract talks between General Motors and striking United Auto Workers took a big step toward an agreement Wednesday when committees finished their work and sent it to the top bargainers. 

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

Local union members walking the picket line in front of General Motors got some big-name support Wednesday. Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez walked the line in front of the GM Powertrain plant in the Town of Tonawanda.

Mike Desmond / WBFO News

As of midnight, 1,357 United Auto Workers at the General Motors engine plant in the Town of Tonawanda were on strike. They joined workers at plants across the country in a nationwide action, after both sides failed to agree on a new contract over issues including wages, health care and profit-sharing.

Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET Monday

Talks between General Motors and union officials representing tens of thousands of striking autoworkers restarted Monday in hopes of driving both sides to an agreement on issues including workers' wages, health care and profit-sharing.

After several hours, union officials representing nearly 50,000 workers acknowledge negotiations remain in neutral.