U.S. Supreme Court

Updated at 9:34 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday granted a Trump administration request to reinstate restrictions for patients seeking to obtain a drug used to terminate early pregnancies.

Updated at 2:33 p.m. ET

The Senate Judiciary Committee held its fourth and final day of hearings on Thursday on President Trump's nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court.

If confirmed, Barrett, 48, would replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the high court.

Updated at 11:01 a.m. ET

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is lying in repose at the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday and Thursday, a two-day event honoring a justice who was both a cultural and legal icon.

As Ginsburg's casket arrived at the high court, former law clerks lined the Supreme Court steps. Supreme Court police officers served as pallbearers. Then the justice's family, close friends and members of the court held a brief ceremony in the court's Great Hall.

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Monday marked the 21st anniversary of the Supreme Court decision that allowed people with disabilities the right to live in their community and not be subject to unjustified isolation. But advocates said much more must be done, especially in the age of COVID-19.

The Center for Disability Rights hosted a webinar Monday that looked at the impact of the Olmstead v. L.C. decision, and attendees discussed ways to ensure that everyone has a right to live and participate in the community.

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A U.S. Supreme Court decision Monday saying federal law bars discrimination against LGBTQ people drew praise from Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul.

Abortion rights are on the chopping block Wednesday as the Supreme Court hears arguments in a case nearly identical to one decided just four years ago.

It's the first major abortion case to come before the court since the 2018 retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, making it the first time the majority of justices hearing an abortion case have anti-abortion-rights judicial records.

Gun rights supporters expect to win a major victory in the U.S. Supreme Court, even though the law at issue was repealed before the High Court decided to hear the case.

U.S. Supreme Court

The University at Buffalo has received confirmation that U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will visit the university and Kleinhans Music Hall Monday as scheduled.

File Photo / Associated Press

Retired Justice John Paul Stevens will lie in respose at the Supreme Court Monday, before his funeral Tuesday at Arlington National Cemetery. The man who died last week at the age of 99 served 35 years on the nation's highest court. Former Stevens law clerk and University at Buffalo law fellow Nancy Marder will be among those attending his burial.


What was he thinking? That is the question many are asking on both sides of the political spectrum.

Chief Justice John Roberts repeatedly voted with the Supreme Court's conservatives this term, except in one, and only one, 5-4 decision. Written by Roberts, the ruling blocked the addition of a citizenship question on the 2020 census, leaving an angry President Trump desperately trying to find a way around it.

It also left a lot of speculation about the motives of the chief justice.

The U.S. Supreme Court, narrowly divided along ideological lines, ruled Tuesday that the government may detain — without a hearing — legal immigrants long after they have served the sentences for crimes they committed.

With the Supreme Court now having five justices who are less likely to approve of gun regulations and laws, it granted a major gun case Tuesday for the first time in nearly a decade.

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A Virginia businessman convicted of helping in a parental kidnapping through Niagara Falls is asking the nation's highest court to suspend the start of his prison term while he appeals.

Updated at 9:20 a.m. ET

The Supreme Court welcomes its newest justice Tuesday as Brett Kavanaugh takes the bench for his first arguments since a contentious Senate voted narrowly to confirm him, cementing a decades-long campaign by conservatives to reshape the nation's highest court.

Across the country, Americans were transfixed Thursday by television coverage of Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh as they testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Ford spoke of her allegation that the Supreme Court nominee had sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers in 1982. Kavanaugh vehemently denied it.

Christine Blasey Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were in high school in the early 1980s. On Thursday the psychology professor is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Read her opening statement below.

On Thursday, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh will appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee to testify on a sexual assault allegation by Christine Blasey Ford, who is also testifying. Read Kavanaugh's opening statement below, submitted to the panel on Wednesday.

National Public Radio

Critics have noted Brett Kavanaugh's work at expanding presidential power during his time with the Bush administration, raising concerns that his confirmation onto the Supreme Court would grant President Donald Trump unchecked authority on a wide range of policies. Peter Yacobucci, Buffalo State professor of political science, offers some perspective. "That just simply goes with the trend that we've seen from the Court for largely its entire history.  The Court has almost always allowed the Presidency to expand, especially in war times."

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Activists and Democratic Party leaders are vowing to fight Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court. That push, however, may not have universal support among all Democrats. In an interview with WBFO, Buffalo State Political Science Professor Peter Yacobucci points out "there are so many Democratic Senators that are up for election in states that Trump won." Those Senators may need to support Kavanaugh's nomination as they fight for reelection.

BuffaloState.edu

Organized labor across the nation suffered a major blow Wednesday when the U.S. Supreme Court issued its ruling in Janus v. AFSCME. With the decision, public employees are no longer required to pay union dues, though they may still benefit from union-bargained contracts. "This has an impact on New York more than any other state," said Peter Yacobucci, professor of political science at Buffalo State College. "It will be devastating for public sector unions."


New York’s union leaders are condemning the U.S. Supreme Court decision that upheld the right of a worker to not pay union dues. But a newly passed state law might mitigate the effects of Janus v. AFSCME.


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On Monday, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that a federal ban on sports betting is unconstitutional. The ruling, based on a New Jersey case, allows states to decide for themselves whether to allow it. New York State allows gaming, from Native-run casinos to racinos that host video slots to Off-Track Betting centers. The Supreme Court ruling raises the question: will sports betting soon join the list of gambling options in the state?


photo by Ashley Hassett

Approximately 20 states and the District of Columbia have joined a coalition that urges the Supreme Court to protect workers' rights to organize.

Bishop applauds Supreme Court ruling on contraception

Jun 30, 2014
WBFO News file photo

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that business owners can refuse to provide health insurance that covers birth control to their employees. The Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo called the decision a "victory."