U.S. Supreme Court

Updated at 9:20 a.m. ET

The Supreme Court welcomes its newest justice Tuesday as Brett Kavanaugh takes the bench for his first arguments since a contentious Senate voted narrowly to confirm him, cementing a decades-long campaign by conservatives to reshape the nation's highest court.

Across the country, Americans were transfixed Thursday by television coverage of Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh as they testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Ford spoke of her allegation that the Supreme Court nominee had sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers in 1982. Kavanaugh vehemently denied it.

Christine Blasey Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were in high school in the early 1980s. On Thursday the psychology professor is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Read her opening statement below.

On Thursday, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh will appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee to testify on a sexual assault allegation by Christine Blasey Ford, who is also testifying. Read Kavanaugh's opening statement below, submitted to the panel on Wednesday.

National Public Radio

Critics have noted Brett Kavanaugh's work at expanding presidential power during his time with the Bush administration, raising concerns that his confirmation onto the Supreme Court would grant President Donald Trump unchecked authority on a wide range of policies. Peter Yacobucci, Buffalo State professor of political science, offers some perspective. "That just simply goes with the trend that we've seen from the Court for largely its entire history.  The Court has almost always allowed the Presidency to expand, especially in war times."

npr.org

Activists and Democratic Party leaders are vowing to fight Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court. That push, however, may not have universal support among all Democrats. In an interview with WBFO, Buffalo State Political Science Professor Peter Yacobucci points out "there are so many Democratic Senators that are up for election in states that Trump won." Those Senators may need to support Kavanaugh's nomination as they fight for reelection.

BuffaloState.edu

Organized labor across the nation suffered a major blow Wednesday when the U.S. Supreme Court issued its ruling in Janus v. AFSCME. With the decision, public employees are no longer required to pay union dues, though they may still benefit from union-bargained contracts. "This has an impact on New York more than any other state," said Peter Yacobucci, professor of political science at Buffalo State College. "It will be devastating for public sector unions."


New York’s union leaders are condemning the U.S. Supreme Court decision that upheld the right of a worker to not pay union dues. But a newly passed state law might mitigate the effects of Janus v. AFSCME.


Is sports betting inevitable in New York State?

May 14, 2018
Wikipedia.org

On Monday, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that a federal ban on sports betting is unconstitutional. The ruling, based on a New Jersey case, allows states to decide for themselves whether to allow it. New York State allows gaming, from Native-run casinos to racinos that host video slots to Off-Track Betting centers. The Supreme Court ruling raises the question: will sports betting soon join the list of gambling options in the state?


photo by Ashley Hassett

Approximately 20 states and the District of Columbia have joined a coalition that urges the Supreme Court to protect workers' rights to organize.

Bishop applauds Supreme Court ruling on contraception

Jun 30, 2014
WBFO News file photo

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that business owners can refuse to provide health insurance that covers birth control to their employees. The Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo called the decision a "victory."