water levels

Payne Horning

At a special state hearing in Oswego County Tuesday, government officials admitted that there is effectively no way to prevent Lake Ontario from once again reaching the record high levels seen this year. In fact, they said it is bound to happen again. However, they think there may be ways to reduce the amount of damage the flooding caused along the shoreline.

Online Screen Grab / WBFO News

The ongoing lake shore erosion in Youngstown is now threatening one of the buildings at Old Fort Niagara.

For the first time in over 50 years, the U.S. and Canada are changing the way they regulate water levels on Lake Ontario. It’s an attempt to meet the changing needs of people who use the lake – from the shipping industry to environmentalists.

But homeowners fear the change may mean more flooding.


Chris Caya/WBFO News

Improvements are on the way for a facility used by researchers who track the health of local waterways.

File photo

A new report from Ontario paints a gloomy economic picture as a result of continued low water levels in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River. It could cost the U.S. and Canada more than $19 billion by the year 2050.