WBFO Education Desk

Pat Bradley / WAMC News

The State University of New York is pushing hard against the coronavirus, with a massive increase in testing using tests newly developed by SUNY Upstate.

WBFO file photo

The AAA of Western and Central New York is out with its annual "School's Open - Drive Carefully" campaign. This year, as schools reopen under a different operational model, drivers are being reminded again to look out for youngsters. And, they're being told to be vigilant, not just during the traditional school bus hours but also throughout the day.

File Photo / WBFO News

Tensions over how and when to safely reopen schools continue to run high, even as several Western New York school districts prepare to start classes next week. WBFO’s Kyle Mackie reports on one group of workers that’s caught in the middle of all of it: teachers.


More harsh warnings to students, as hundreds of COVID-19 cases close down a SUNY campus for the semester.

University at Buffalo Graduate School of Education

A two-day virtual “teach-in” kicks off Thursday morning at the University at Buffalo Graduate School of Education with the goal of examining the role of K-12 and higher education in building greater racial equity.

Michael Mroziak, WBFO

When Buffalo Public Schools open their new yearnext week with an all-virtual model, not all students' needs may be properly addressed. That was the sentiment of several parents speaking Tuesday morning.

University at Buffalo

Over the weekend, the State University of New York at Oneonta became the first in the 64-campus system to shut down in-person classes for two weeks after a coronavirus outbreak. State and college officials are trying to prevent that closure from becoming a trend.

Kyle S. Mackie/WBFO News

The Buffalo Teachers Federation requested an emergency injunction from the state supreme court Monday that would prevent Buffalo Public Schools from requiring teachers to report to school buildings at least two days per week this fall, if secured.


Dan Clark / New York Now

As schools in New York State grapple with reopening plans during the COVID-19 pandemic, they are also facing a temporary 20% cut in state funding, that could become permanent.

Orleans Niagara BOCES

In the fight over whether students should be studying virtually, in school every day or some combination, there are students caught in the middle. Some are in vocational or career and technical education and need mostly hands-on training. That is hard to do at home.

Eileen Buckley / WBFO News

The Ontario government has unveiled its plan for how it will handle a possible COVID-19 outbreak in schools. Premier Doug Ford said his government is prepared to do whatever it takes to protect children.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday that there won’t be any high school football games, wrestling matches or ice hockey contests this fall. The governor did issue new guidelines to phase in matches for other types of school sports, however.

Kyle S. Mackie/WBFO News

Buffalo Superintendent Dr. Kriner Cash described the district’s decision to start the coming school year remotely on Thursday as “inclusive, systematic and thoughtful.” Buffalo parent leaders, however, said that’s not exactly the full story.


Mark Poloncarz Facebook

Publicly-funded schools across Erie County will receive an extra $15 million in federal funding for COVID-related costs before the end of 2020.

Kyle S. Mackie/WBFO News

Buffalo Public Schools will join dozens of other city school districts like Chicago, Los Angeles and Philadelphia in starting the 2020-2021 school year fully remotely. The Buffalo school board unanimously approved the proposal from Superintendent Dr. Kriner Cash during a virtual meeting Wednesday night.

File Photo / WBFO News

With schools opening in three weeks, districts are still trying to figure out how it will all work.

Kyle S. Mackie / WBFO

In a nearly hour-long interview with WBFO Wednesday, Superintendent of Buffalo Public Schools Dr. Kriner Cash spoke about the district’s reopening plans and why he doesn’t feel comfortable with a full in-person return to school buildings this fall.


While several school districts throughout New York continue to deliberate how to safely open school this year, West Seneca will start at home. District officials said they will utilize a multifaceted plan that will reopen in phases. West Seneca Central School District Superintendent Matthew Bystrak shared how they came to make this decision.

Addressing the constant changing guidelines. Taking time to assess in person learning in smaller groups before allowing everyone back to school. Making sure the PPE they have is appropriate for the circumstances they have. Bystrak and West Seneca are taking precautions against the ambiguity of COVID-19 while committing resources to remote learning.

Buffalo Public Schools / Facebook

Buffalo Public Schools are about a month away from opening for the new year and even that's not definite. Schools Superintendent Kriner Cash told an online public meeting Monday night there are a lot of "ifs" and "buts" in the future.

File Photo/Governor's office

Governor Cuomo announced on Monday that 107 school districts have yet to submit reopening plans to the New York State Department of Health. However, this announcement has caused some confusion among school districts that didn’t even know they were supposed to.

Salamanca is just one of nine Western New York school districts that were listed as having not submitted their reopening plans to the Department of Health.

File Photo / WBFO News

The Buffalo Teachers Federation is looking at a lawsuit against city public schools reopening under the plan submitted to Albany.

Schools in New York will reopen in the fall, Cuomo Says

Aug 7, 2020
File Photo/WBFO News

On Friday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo formally gave schools the green light to reopen, saying the coronavirus infection rate was low enough in New York for students to return to class in the coming weeks.

Nick Lippa / WBFO

Teachers and community leaders gathered Wednesday afternoon at Broderick Park to discuss the best way educators could help achieve racial and social justice. Their solution? They want to form a caucus inside the Buffalo Teachers Federation.


Kyle S. Mackie/WBFO News

Parent leaders and the Buffalo Teachers Federation are criticizing Buffalo Public Schools for a lack of transparency and community feedback in the district’s process of developing reopening plans for this fall. The district posted a “working draft” plan on its website Friday night and has said “it’s not done until it’s done.”


International Child Advancement

Many families are struggling financially after losing work during the pandemic, including some recently-resettled refugees. A back-to-school supply and food drive taking place now hopes to benefit their children.


Dan Clark / New York Now

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he’ll decide this week on whether schools can partially or fully reopen in September. Meanwhile, many school districts have been busy figuring out safe ways to reopen during the COVID-19 pandemic, and some have already made some preliminary decisions.

Kyle S. Mackie / WBFO News

Buffalo Teachers Federation President Philip Rumore is calling for the removal of the city school administrators in charge of the district's "reopening committee."

File Photo / WBFO News

School board members in New York are concerned they might not be able to successfully fully or partially reopen schools without an infusion of cash from the state or federal governments.

Eileen Buckley / WBFO News

School districts across New York are supposed to send Albany their plans for starting school in the time of COVID-19 by Friday, but Buffalo Teachers Federation President Phil Rumore says that is way too soon.

Daniel Robertson and Jeremy Besch share similar philosophies on educating today’s youth despite coming from vastly different backgrounds.

“I grew up with an absent father,” said Robertson, Program Manager for Say Yes Buffalo’s Boys and Young Men of Color initiative. “I pretty much grew up around individuals that looked like me. I had friends who were in the streets and sold drugs and went to jail. I had friends who I grew up with who are no longer here now because of gun violence.”

Pages